Alastair White is a Scottish composer and writer. Described as “spellbinding” (Boulezian), “beautiful” (730 Review), “virtuosic” (Winnipeg Free Press), "deftly manic" (American Record Guide) and "passionately atonal" (Gramophone), his work is characterised by a lyrical complexity which draws influence from technology, science, politics and materialism. Recent projects include the fashion-operas WEAR, ROBE 

(Métier Records February '21) and WOAD; a string quartet for the Altius Quartet’s album Quadrants

Vol. 3 (Navona Records); the documentary opera A Boat in an Endless Blue SeaWORK: movement through a series of arbitrary partitions for .abeceda; and The Drowning Shore, a Scots-Yiddish cantata.

Shortlisted for a Scottish Award for New Music twice (in 2019 and 2020) and a Creative Edinburgh Award (2019), Alastair has created work for the opera festivals Tête-a-Tête and Opera in the City, the international poetry festival STanza, UKNA City Takeover, Compass Presents, The Scottish School of Contemporary Dance and The Scottish Poetry Library. His music is supported by Help Musicians UK, the Hinrichsen Foundation, Marchus Trust, Goldsmiths Graduate Fund and Music Research Committee.

Alastair was a founding member of the Edinburgh-based bands White Heath (Electric Honey) and Blank Comrade (Red Wharf), and has worked as a session pianist and producer. He is currently undertaking a PhD at Goldsmiths, University of London with Roger Redgate and Lauren Redhead, where he organised the interdisciplinary conference on New Materialism Futures of the Real. He publishes and speaks internationally on his research interests, which include the development of an original materialist philosophy, ‘Contingency Dialectics,’ and its methodological implications in Fashion-Opera. 

  • YouTube
  • Twitter
  • Instagram
  • Facebook

PRAISE

Accomplishment in both musical writing and performances was undeniable, even spellbinding. Had this been a song-cycle – or cantata – I should have been gripped, but staging...left one in no doubt that this was not only an opera, but an opera of rare imagination – and success. I am keen to hear more. - Mark Berry, Boulezian

Undeniably, WEAR is a beautiful show...I wholly look forward to what this talented company conjure up next. - Sam Lawrence, The 730 Review

White's music has an intriguing elaboration to it, with instruments and voices executing striking arabesques, jagged and angular, and the resulting textures successfully evoked the strange abstract world of cyberspace, creating a real sense of non-reality…The performances from all concerned were excellent. - Robert Hugill, Planet Hugill

A passionately atonal essay about time. - Gramophone

A virtuosic showstopper. - Winnipeg Free Press

There are some real gems here...Alastair White’s Two Panels for String Quartet deftly switches between two wildly different sound worlds in a manic, musical dialog. - American Record Guide

Alastair White’s Two Panels is conceived around polar opposities related to the sense of chaos or line, as well as components of time and space (which may also connect to registral considerations).  Harmonically we move toward a more atonal expression...Certainly, this is another fine exploration of modern writing for string quartets that should be of interest to fans of this genre.  The music is certainly quite engaging throughout. - Steven A. Kennedy,  Cinemusical

Completely atonal but not necessarily 12-tone, and I was very happy to hear that he knows how to use this technique to create music and not just a labyrinth of sound that confuses the listener. Complex and modern as it is, it also has good form and structure and, in places, shows a sense of humour. - Lynn René Bayley, The Art Music Lounge.

An amazing project. - Sonograma Magazine

Dammit, I really enjoyed this release! - Norman Lebrecht, Slipped Disc

Very well done...and like nothing else I've seen. - John Gilks, Opera Ramblings

 

The work packs a strong punch in its 14 minutes...This is a work with much to unpack, from White's music to the multi-layered, multi-lingual text. - Robert Hugill, Planet Hugill

 

The Drowning Shore is a gorgeous act of ghosts and limits and liminal remembrance, a 14-minute cantata in Scots and Yiddish reaching through water and time to speak of marginalized languages and imperial borders and once again the love between two women that is the heart of Sholem Asch's God of Vengeance, the playwright's great-great-granddaughter now the performer in her bird-of-paradise brilliance, in ancestral tartan, in frum-black silk that made me think, intended or not, of Hanna Rovina's Leye in The Dybbuk, crumbling earth between her fingers, writing holy letters on the air. I managed to watch it this afternoon for its streaming premiere, no less haunted for being digital...I commend it highly to your attention. - Myth Happens

The ideas and dynamics, the go-for-it approach, the instrumentation, the fearless and erratic arrangement of each song was refreshingly new, daring, and immediate in its impact. After a lifetime in and around the music industry and having become numb to the never ending cart loads of re-shaped, re-fashioned, re-visited, and regurgitated plagiarisms from the musical mountains of the past's 'golden age', hearing their work was an absolute delight. - Graham Bowers

© 2018. All rights reserved.

  • w-facebook
  • w-tbird
  • w-youtube